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No. Jesus may not be considered Adam re-incarnate. Yet it's not hard to figure out where somebody might have gotten that idea. This is just a case of not understanding the terminology being used. Somebody got some of the words cross-wired¹ without understanding the concept. In Christianity Jesus is known as the "Second Adam" or "Last Adam" but the naming ...


8

First, we must understand that only God is inherently immortal. The apostle Paulos states that God "alone has immortality" (ὁ μόνος ἔχων ἀθανασίαν) (1 Tim. 6:16), for He alone is uncreated. Everything else that is not God is a creature, and thus, not inherently immortal. Now, although many creatures are not inherently immortal, God gives them immortality as ...


7

There's nothing in scripture that supports the idea of reincarnation, meaning that the soul of a deceased person begins anew in the body of another. Jesus is referred to as a "new Adam" here, which may be what you heard: 1 Corinthians 15:45 The first man Adam became a living being; the last Adam, a life-giving spirit. Though this is plainly read as ...


5

The Church Fathers referred to Jesus as the New Adam And one who is very bold might venture even to come to the New Adam, my God and Lord Jesus Christ, Who is counted the Seventy-seventh from the old Adam who fell under sin, in the backward genealogy according to Luke St. Gregory of Nanianzus (AD 325-389) - Oration 41 So the idea has been around ...


5

Doctrine and Covenants 105:53-56 53 Three years previous to the death of Adam, he called Seth, Enos, Cainan, Mahalaleel, Jared, Enoch, and Methuselah, who were all high priests, with the residue of his posterity who were righteous, into the valley of Adam-ondi-Ahman, and there bestowed upon them his last blessing. 54 And the Lord appeared ...


5

The answer can actually be found in the very next verse: 35 But only an account of this earth, and the inhabitants thereof, give I unto you. For behold, there are many worlds that have passed away by the word of my power. And there are many that now stand, and innumerable are they unto man; but all things are numbered unto me, for they are mine and I ...


3

H3br3wHamm3r81's answer is good, but it is maybe too well argued, and I think perhaps s/he is missing the forest for the trees. God told our first parents ". . . for in the day that you eat from [the tree of the knowledge of good and evil] you will surely die" (Genesis2:17b). I'll leave the Hebrew-to-English translation job to those who are ...


2

The Bible is silent on why Adam chose as he did, though there is much speculation on the subject. One conjecture that comes up from time to time is fear. In the early accounts of creation, God judges nearly everything to be good, except one: for Man to be alone. Adam had endured this before Eve came, and although he did not see Eve drop dead on the spot, he ...


2

Life is determined by our relationship to God. Mortality is being susceptible to death, Adam was always susceptible to death and God warned Adam of his susceptibility: Genesis 2:16,17 And the LORD God commanded the man, saying, Of every tree of the garden thou mayest freely eat: But of the tree of the knowledge of good and evil, thou shalt not eat of ...


2

Yes. As @Brasshat cites in his answer, Genesis 3:22 shows that to take from the Tree of Life allows one to live forever, and Adam and Eve were expelled from the garden specifically so that they could not eat from the Tree of Life and live eternally. Messiah reveals in John 17 that to live forever means to know the Father and the Son, in the sense of ...


1

No, Adam and Eve were not meant to live forever. If they had been, God would not have made the pronouncement in Genesis 3:22, "and now, lest he put forth his hand, and take also from the tree of life, and eat, and live forever"­--Therefore the Lord God sent him forth from the Garden of Eden...


1

I've read some great content here. I think, though, the exact answer to this question is much easier. When God had only so far made Adam, in Genesis chapter 2:16-17, God gave Adam the warning that, "You may freely eat any fruit in the garden except fruit from the tree of the knowledge of good and evil. If you eat its fruit, you will surely die". Adam had a ...


1

From the first Adam we inherited death, or our sin nature, and seperation from God, But Christ came to reverse that and restore us to the state where we are no longer overcome by sin, but have control of our life through His crucifiction. Read Romans ch 6 or for an expanded version and excellent exposition, The Normal Christian Life, by Watchman Nee. This is ...


1

What are the major views on Adam's motivation to sin given that he was not deceived? According to Genesis 3:6, after the woman had eaten, she offered the fruit to her husband who was with her. I see here only a change in panorama, not a change in chronology. Adam had been standing there the entire time. He heard it all, he saw it all. If we look at ...


1

I cannot see how this question can ever be answered according to any Scripture I know. The only inference I can draw to a possible answer is that without knowing good from evil, unless Adam were with Eve when the Serpent deceived her; he might not know that that fruit his wife gave him was the forbidden fruit. otherwise like all men we know to just eat what ...


1

Perhaps death was not the RESULT of Adam's disobedience, but CERTAIN ("surely die") death was the RESULT. That is, Adam was created mortal. As a mortal, Adam would eventually die. Hence, the availability of the Tree of Life (TOL). That is, unless Adam partook of the TOL which he was free to eat from, he would eventually die. It is clear from scripture ...



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