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87

One of the most important passages regarding this is found in the Mosaic Law which God gave to Israel to be used in governance: "When men strive together and hit a pregnant woman, so that her children come out, but there is no harm, the one who hit her shall surely be fined, as the woman’s husband shall impose on him, and he shall pay as the judges ...


33

A wide variety of scripture can be cited in obvious support of abortion (as an act of murder) is inherently immoral: Jeremiah 1:5 Before I formed you in the womb I knew you, And before you were born I consecrated you; I have appointed you a prophet to the nations. Psalm 139:5 For You formed my inward parts; You wove me in my mother’s womb. ...


24

I'd like to make a few secular/political contributions to this question. This answer probably should not qualify for the accepted answer, but I think it's worth adding here that there are some good scientific legal arguments against abortion, and it's not solely an issue of religion vs science. Abortion is legal in the United States because of the 1973 Roe ...


12

The woman has committed a very grave evil, in that she is complicit in the death of an innocent human being. How much of that evil can be "imputed" to her, that is, treated as "her fault", may vary according to circumstances. Catholics recognize two broad classes of sin: mortal sin (also known as serious sin), and venial sin. The distinction between the two ...


11

Yes, there is a difference. On the matter of abortion, the Catechism and Canon Law is explicit. It is a grave offence with instant excommunication. The penalty applies to everyone involved, including the mother if she consents and any medical personnel. Formal cooperation in an abortion constitutes a grave offense. The Church attaches the ...


10

Nothing specific to abortion, although I wouldn't expect there to be. 2 Timothy 3:1-7 gives us:  1 But mark this: There will be terrible times in the last days. 2 People will be lovers of themselves, lovers of money, boastful, proud, abusive, disobedient to their parents, ungrateful, unholy, 3 without love, unforgiving, slanderous, without self-control, ...


10

Yes, in the eyes of the Catholic Church, under the guidance of the Pontifical Council for the Family abortion has been likened to murder. The moral gravity of procured abortion is apparent in all its truth if we recognize that we are dealing with murder and, in particular, when we consider the specific elements involved. The one eliminated is a human ...


7

This takes the long route to coming to the actual answer. Unfortunately, the ultimate answer is purely speculative. Whether any given entity would do something is all speculative compared to asking whether a given entity has done that thing. The best we can do is look at what has been done, what has been said, and use logic applied to the complexity and ...


7

No, and this isn't surprising considering the state of medical knowledge in Old Testament times. (And it really hadn't advanced all that much by NT times.) There was no way to diagnose that carrying a pregnancy to term would put the mother's life in danger, the way we can today with electric-powered technologies such as ultrasound imaging.


7

The Catholic catechism has a section on abortion (2270-2275). It starts with this: Human life must be respected and protected absolutely from the moment of conception. From the first moment of his existence, a human being must be recognized as having the rights of a person - among which is the inviolable right of every innocent being to life. Before I ...


7

Catholicism does not keep a comprehensive list of what does and does not constitute a sin; there are too many actions with moral consequence to allow for such a list. Although the Catechism of the Catholic Church does point out several actions (including procuring an abortion) as sins, even grave sins, it says nothing specifically about voting for candidates ...


6

I will begin by observing that the answer to this question is a logical and philosophical one, hence it does not depend on a particular religion or denomination. It is human nature itself that demands utmost respect for all human beings, and hence all people—regardless of religion—are obligated to work for the end to direct abortion in all cases. I will, ...


5

John Cardinal O'Connor, archbishop of New York of 10-20 years ago, once declared that if any woman were having an abortion because of the financial difficulties, to come see him. And as far as "paying the mother to carry child to term", this is essentially the terms of some adoptions. I know of a case where this happened, where an adoption was arranged ...


5

Protestant Denominations Wikipedia states that Protestant denominations that support abortion rights include the United Church of Christ, the United Methodist Church, the Episcopalian Church, and the United Presbyterian Church, the Episcopal Church, the Presbyterian Church (USA), The United Church of Christ, The United Methodist Church, and the Lutheran ...


5

Both situations described illustrate a lack of faith in God. I would imagine that a Christian pondering the situation would either (please pardon the generalizations) not believe that God knows or is able to save their lives or, not believe that the outcome of carrying the baby to term would ultimately be the best outcome for for both the baby and mother. ...


5

It is not about abortion, it's about Jealousy and the Lord acting as a witness in trials that otherwise had none. Note that the NIV is the only translation to use the word 'miscarriage' (see Numbers 5:22 in parallel to 18 other translations). The translators interpret 'Your thigh to rot' and 'to rot [your] thigh' as 'miscarriage'. Whereas the Hebrew for ...


5

Many commentators throughout church history have addressed this issue, though not all of them have done so while specifically citing or quoting the passage in question. Thus, for example, we can't necessarily agree with modern editors when they tell us that the Didache (1st/2nd century) and the Apostolic Constitutions (4th century) were referring to Exodus ...


5

The question is very well addressed in a guide published by Catholic Answers. In a nutshell, the answer is that a Catholic (and, frankly, every human being, regardless of religion) is bound in conscience never to support public policies that encourage abortion, and this duty includes the grave obligation to vote for those candidates who will best protect ...


4

I'm going to disagree slightly with Andrew Leach on this one. As far as excommunication: since you obviously weren't a member of the Church at the time, excommunication is obviously impossible. The information Andrew gives on excommunication for abortion is valuable, though; you should certainly be aware of just how seriously the Church takes this action. ...


3

In Roman Catholic canon law, an interdict is an ecclesiastical censure that excludes from certain rites of the Church individuals or groups, who nonetheless do not cease to be members of the Church. The pope can at any time choose to use his interdict powers to deny the sacraments to all nations whose laws allow abortion. The widespread support of ...


3

You seem to be laboring with a misconception. contraception and abortion are not the same thing; Contraception loosely defined is the prevention of a pregnancy, while Abortion is the termination of a pregnancy. And while there is some merit to your saying that they both thwart God's plans, you must balance that with the fact that an omniscient God knew that ...


3

I personally disagree with this analysis, but typically, if a biblical basis is given, it is this: Exodus 21:22 - 23 22 “If people are fighting and hit a pregnant woman and she gives birth prematurely[e] but there is no serious injury, the offender must be fined whatever the woman’s husband demands and the court allows. 23 But if there is serious ...


2

I'll reference the previous (nearly identical) question's answers: Exodus 21:22-25 "When men strive together and hit a pregnant woman, so that her children come out, but there is no harm, the one who hit her shall surely be fined, as the woman’s husband shall impose on him, and he shall pay as the judges determine. But if there is harm, then you shall ...


2

In the eyes of natural moral law and the church direct abortion is tantamount to murder (whether the legislature agrees or not). Direct abortion is when one chooses to intentionally abort a fertilized egg. However, indirect abortion is not tantamount to murder. Indirect abortion is when one does something that is not intended to harm the child, but the ...


2

The idea is based on the following logic: In Exodus we learn that while Israel resided in Egypt under the oppression of the Pharaoh, God planned to bring a deliverer to His people: Moses. However, when Moses was born, Pharaoh had issued a decree to slay the firstborn sons. Moses was spared from this slaughter by the providence of God, and went on to lead ...


2

There can be no definitive answer on this. The easiest way is to compare all the different translations and make your own conclusion, for yourself and not for others. Examples: Ecclesiastes 11:5 NIV - As you do not know the path of the wind, or how the body is formed in a mother's womb, so you cannot understand the work of God, the Maker of all ...


2

It is a sin of the gravest seriousness, and results in excommunication by virtue of committing the act (this is what latae sententiae means: one does not have to be declared excommunicated; procuring an abortion procures excommunication). It must be confessed. As the excommunication is not reserved to the Apostolic See, any priest with the faculty to remit ...



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