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During Creation, God created man:

Genesis 2:7 KJV

And the LORD God formed man of the dust of the ground, and breathed into his nostrils the breath of life; and man became a living soul.

Why did God created such complexity - down to cellular level, with so many organs and fluid - into man? Wouldn't things be much simpler if we were created with less complexity - and probably with the chance of reducing all the medical problems that we face today.

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+1: This is a pretty darn good question. Thanks! –  Jim G. Feb 29 '12 at 4:21

3 Answers 3

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He created such complexity because it exists in Him as well, as we are explicitly created after His own image and in His likeness, as His children.

Genesis 1:27 (KJV)

27 So God created man in his own image, in the image of God created he him; male and female created he them.

As for medical problems, those are inherently bound up with death and mortality, which weren't part of the original creation, but were introduced in the Fall.

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Yes, God created man according to ideal, and is quite capable of sustaining him in that perfect ideal... but we chose to be our own God - in the words of Dr Phil: "How's that working for you?" –  Lawrence Dol Aug 27 '11 at 20:51

Man is complex because he was created to perform many complex functions. Einstein once said, "Make everything as simple as possible ... but not simpler."

The human body is made to survive in environments from freezing cold to broiling hot. We can live on many different kinds of food. We can perform manual labor or refined intellectual contemplation. Etc etc.

Compare the human body to any machine you have ever seen. Simple machines can do one thing very well, but are generally useless for anything else. A bicycle is great for travelling on flat services, not so good on rough ground, and pretty useless for climbing mountains. An airplane goes very fast through the air, but is not so good under water. A calculator is great for performing arithmetic quickly and accurately, not so useful at telling the temperature or evaluating the creativity of a poem. Etc. But a human being can walk, climb, swim, add and subtract, distinguish hot and cold, write poems, and a million other things.

And by the way, I think you've got it backwards on complexity being a cause of medical problems. The human body can fight infection and repair itself when damaged. The ability to repair itself is awesome. I develop computer systems for a living, and just trying to build a computer system that can correct bad data or recover cleanly from a power failure is an extremely difficult problem. Usually an outside intelligence -- the programmer -- must repair damaged data, the system can't fix itself.

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Man is exactly as complex as he needs to be to be man - no more, no less.

I find it interesting that god could have created man in his image, which, until after the creation, he could have had none. The elements needed to construct man did not exist until well after the third "day" of the creation saga as they are formed only within the furnace of a star. Other than hydrogen, there were no other elements in existence until the morning of the second "day" at a minimum. Hence the days referred to are cycles of star construction and burnout - the heavier elements appearing at the burnout or end of one "day" and incorporated into the creation occurring on the next.

So, just as the "days" were obviously not days, there would obviously not have been a being composed of matter in existence - it does say that the face of god moved on the waters or some such. The best I can interpret is that we are the face of god, we are its image - and we are its only consiousness as far as we can tell too.

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