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Does anyone know what works are considered to be principal elements of Western soteriological thought, primarily focused on Roman Catholic and Protestant ideologies?

I'm interested mostly in primary texts by the likes of Martin Luther, Erasmus, and Calvin, since I've had a hard time finding exactly where in, for instance, Luther's Works, he discusses such things.

Example: I'm reading a book on Luther's inception, and it sends me to "LW 34:167", which corresponds to one of Luther's soteriological writings. I'm curious if people know about stuff like this for other theological thinkers; for instance where Calvin outlines his theories of predestination.

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Welcome to Christianity.SE! This is a good question but I'm skeptical that it can be well answered. I hope people prove me wrong, but I think the answer is that the topic is generally spread through vast swaths of writings from each theologian. –  Caleb Mar 11 '12 at 6:56
    
Yeah, I more or less figured as much. Shame that back in the day Luther and Calvin and such seemed to avoid writing things titled "Salvation" or the like. –  Kyle Willey Mar 11 '12 at 13:58

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When I took Soteriology, we read alot of primary sources. I asked my old professor, Tarmo Toom, an expert in patristic soteriology, for that list. I've added links to the two documents you will be most interested in reading.

  • Athanasius, On Incarnation, 25-64;
  • Augustine, On Nature and Grace, 22-51, 58-67.
  • Anselm, Why God Became Man? (Book Two);
  • Aquinas, Summa Theologica 12ae, Q 109, Art. 1-10.

I remember Athanasius' On Incarnation to be particularly interesting - the idea was that salvation was God's way of telling Jesus how much he loved him, by giving him us and eternal life in us as a love offering...

Specifically, for Luther and Calvin:

Finally, for more modern perspectives, he selected:

  • Soteriology: A Contemporary Protestant/Evangelical Perspective W. G. Rusch, Justification and the Future of the Ecumenical Movement, 23-34, 35-46, 133-149; (in class, The Gift of Salvation).

  • Soteriology: A Contemporary Roman Catholic Perspective Rahner, Foundations of Christian Faith, 24-43; The Content of Faith, 199-202, 344-349; The Hope of Salvation; (in class, Catechism of the Catholic Church).

Soteriology: A Liberation Perspective - Boff, Salvation and Liberation, 1-66.

Soteriology: An African-American Perspective - Cone, God of the Oppressed, 138-162, 195-246.

Soteriology: A Non-Violent Perspective - Weaver, Nonviolent Atonement, 12-19, 70-98, 210-224.

Soteriology: A Feminist Perspective - Japinga, Feminism and Christianity, 107-126.


Full bibliography here:

  • Anselm, Why God Became Man? in St. Anselm: Basic Writings. Chicago: Open Court, 1996, 253-302.

  • Aquinas, Summa theologica 12ae Q 109, Art. 1-10 in Aquinas on Nature and Grace, ed. A. M. Fairweather. Philadelphia: Westminster, 1954, 137-156.

  • Augustine, On Nature and Grace, in FC 86, trans. John A. Mourant and William J. Collinge, 1992, 22-90.

  • Boff, L. and C. Salvation and Liberation: In Search of a Balance between Faith and Politics. Translated by R. R. Barr. Maryknoll, NY: Orbis, 1984, 1-66.

  • Canons of the Synod of Dort, in Creeds and Confessions of Faith in the Christian Tradition, ed. J. Pelikan and V. Hotchkiss. New Heaven: Yale University Press, 2003, 571-600.

  • Calvin, J. Institutes, Ch. XI, in Library of Christian Classics. Philadelphia: The Westminster Press, 1961, 89-107.

  • Cone, J. H. God of the Oppressed. New York: Seabury, 1975, 138-162, 195-246.

  • Fiddes, P. S. “The Understanding of Salvation in the Baptist Tradition,” in For Us and For Our Salvation, ed. W. J. Hollenweger. Utrecht: Instituut voor Missiologie, 1994, 15-37. The Hope of Salvation, International Theological Commission. Origins (April 26, 2007): 726-748.

  • Japinga, L. Feminism and Christianity: An Essential Guide. Nashville: Abingdon, 1999, 107-126.

  • Justification and the Future of the Ecumenical Movement: The Joint Declaration on the Doctrine of Justification, ed. W. G. Rusch. Collegeville: Liturgical Press, 2003 (Chadwick, H. “An Anglican Reaction: Across the reformation Divide,” 23-34;

  • Franklin, R. W. “A Model fro New Joint Declaration: An Episcopalian Reaction to the Joint Declaration on Justification,” 35-46; Macchia, F. D. “Justification and the Spirit of Life: A Pentecostal Response to the Joint Declaration,” 133-149).

  • Luther, M. Two Kinds of Righteousness in Martin Luther’s Basic Theological Works, ed. T. F. Lull. Minneapolis: Fortress Press, 1989, 155-164.

  • Rahner, K. Foundations of Christian Faith: An Introduction to the Idea of Christianity. Trans. W. V. Dych. New York: Crossroad, 1978, 24-43.

  • __. The Content of Faith. Ed. K. Lehmann and A. Raffelt, trans. ed. H. D. Egan. New York: Crossroads, 1993, 199-202, 344-349.

  • The Remonstrance (The Ariminian Articles), in Creeds and Confessions of Faith in the Christian Tradition, ed. J. Pelikan and V. Hotchkiss. New Heaven: Yale University Press, 2003, 549-550.

  • Tanner, N. P. (ed.), Decrees of the Ecumenical Councils, vol. II. Washington D.C.: Georgetown University Press, 1990, 671-681.

  • Weaver, J. D. The Nonviolent Atonement. Grand Rapids: Eerdmans, 2001, 12-19, 70-98, 210-224.

  • Anselm, Why God Became Man? in St. Anselm: Basic Writings. Chicago: Open Court, 1974.

  • Boff, L. and C. Salvation and Liberation: In Search of a Balance between Faith and Politics. Translated by R. R. Barr. Maryknoll, NY: Orbis, 1984.

  • Cone, J. H. God of the Oppressed. New York: Seabury, 1975.

  • Dunn, J. D. G. The Theology of Paul the Apostle. Grand Rapids: Eerdmans, 1998.

  • Green, J. B. and Baker, M. D. Recovering the Scandal of Cross: Atonement in New Testament & Contemporary Contexts. Downers Grove: InterVarsity, 2000.

  • Weaver, J. D. The Nonviolent Atonement. Grand Rapids: Eerdmans, 2001.

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Wow, that's a lot of stuff! –  Kyle Willey Mar 13 '12 at 14:39

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