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How to answer “Why does evil and suffering exist?”

If there is a God who created the world etc, how did he get it so wrong that even he got annoyed with it so much so that he would send his son to sort it out. Even the Bible ( I think Revelation ) makes reference to God returning to right all the wrongs – if he made such a wonderful thing as this earth, does he not have the power to sort out where he initially went wrong.

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Welcome to the site! Your question is similar to others asked, and a good answer to yours can be found on the accepted answer to this one: christianity.stackexchange.com/questions/301/… –  David Stratton Nov 26 '11 at 21:23
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Welcome to Christianity.SE! There are several problems I see with your question. First, it makes several assumptions: God made a mistake; God is powerless to correct problems, etc. It also seems to be asking several different questions, some directly, some implied: Why did God send his son? Why does evil exist? Why hasn't God corrected all wrong already? I think for this to be a good question, you must narrow the focus to one of these questions, or to challenging one of these assumptions. Many good questions could be made from this (in fact, many of these have already been asked) –  Flimzy Nov 28 '11 at 5:13
    
I'm voting to re-open this because I think it fits the definition of what makes a desirable duplicate - a question essentially the same as another, but worded differently, so that it will be easier to find basedon how a user would search. I believe iit was a mistake for those of us that closed this to do so. blog.stackoverflow.com/2009/04/handling-duplicate-questions –  David Stratton Dec 5 '11 at 2:30
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marked as duplicate by Waggers, David Stratton, Bruce Alderman, James Black, Flimzy Nov 28 '11 at 5:11

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I'm not quite sure if you are asking about the problem of evil or the amount of natural evil in the world. I will take a stab at them both.

In regards to the problem of evil we have certain considerations. Now when God created us humans he had two choices in regards to free will. He could have given us no free will and with controlled us and made sure that their was no evil in the world.

Now if he had done that we would have serious claims for a unjust God. As it has been mentioned on this site slavery and love do not mix. He would also have the problem that it would invalidate the position of people believing he exist and loves as it would be something forced upon us.

Now if he gave us free will (Which most Christians affirm) than we can come to the knowledge of our free will. This is a way of believing in God that is much more in tune with the notion of a loving God.

No with free will we have the problem that it allows people to do evil (Even though God forbids it). Free will cannot be internally coherent without the option to do evil.

So this idea that the amount evil in the world is inconsistent with a loving God really holds no sway in light of the free will defense.

If you want to read more I can recommend researching Alvin Platinga free will defense. He is probably the biggest name in Christianity writing about these things.

No on the fact of natural evil. I'm not entirely convinced that natural evil exist. Yes we have in the bible various natural event with which God exacts judgment on nations but I do not think that every time their is a earthquake we should be trying to discern whether God is judging us for some wrong doing.

These could be just the natural forces at work with no divine interferences in them.

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