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In Paradise Lost, Milton describes how Lucifer rebelled against God and was cast into Hell as a result. I've always wondered about the origin of this account since as far as I know, it's not mentioned anywhere in the Bible. Is it part of the Catholic creed (or the creed of any Christian denomination?) If so, what is the basis for it?

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I don't know about Milton's so I won't answer regarding him, but as far as Catholicism is concerned the Apostles, Nicene and Athanasian creeds don't mention the Devil. But during Baptism we're asked if we reject Satan quite a few times, then it's followed up by a formulation of the Apostles creed, so it's close. –  Peter Turner Oct 18 '11 at 16:21
    
Thanks, it wasn't really about the concept of Satan per se but more about the concept of being an angel who has fallen due to his rebellion. –  PhilDin Oct 18 '11 at 16:33

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A partial answer may be found in Isaiah 14:12-15.

How you have fallen from heaven, morning star, son of the dawn! You have been cast down to the earth, you who once laid low the nations! You said in your heart, “I will ascend to the heavens; I will raise my throne above the stars of God; I will sit enthroned on the mount of assembly, on the utmost heights of Mount Zaphon. I will ascend above the tops of the clouds; I will make myself like the Most High.” But you are brought down to the realm of the dead, to the depths of the pit. (NIV)

Some interpret the fallen one as Lucifer, since in this passage he rebelled against God and attempted to set himself above God. He was cast down and thrown into the realm of the dead.

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And that's probably referenced by 2 Peter 2:4, Jude 1:6 and Revelation 20:1-2. –  Peter Turner Oct 18 '11 at 16:23

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