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The Bible (particularly the Old Testament) makes many predictions about the future, often regarding nations or peoples quite distant from those making the prophecy.

If we ignore any arguments about the date of authorship and assume that the prophecy is genuine and predated the event it is describing, which prophecies have been fulfilled according to the generally accepted historical record?

One example would be in Ezekiel 26:12 regarding the city of Tyre:

They will plunder your wealth and loot your merchandise; they will break down your walls and demolish your fine houses and throw your stones, timber and rubble into the sea.

It is an uncontroversial statement to say that Alexander the Great threw the houses of mainland Tyre into the sea.

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closed as not constructive by Richard Sep 24 '11 at 14:19

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The prophecy claims the city would be destroyed by Nebuchadnezzar, not Alexander the Great. The siege by Nebuchadnezzar ended in a truce. –  hammar Sep 24 '11 at 13:35
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@hammar While Nebuchadnezzar is mentioned in v7, in v3 Ezekiel talks of "many nations". It is not explicit in saying that Nebuchadnezzar would be responsible for this particular act. See this analysis for further detail. Possibly not the best example to choose though! –  Curious George Sep 24 '11 at 14:17
    
This question is really too broad for this site. This site is better suited towards specific facts, events, and well-honed answers. This particular question will lead to a list of answers, instead of "one right answer". Because of that I'm closing this question as Too Broad. –  Richard Sep 24 '11 at 14:19
    
hammar - I don't think that is correct. (I may be wrong, I often am) but... Verse 2 says "I will bring many nations against you". Nebuchadnezzar was the ruler of one of these MANY nations that were brought against Tyre. Read Chapter 26 in it's entirety. Note the change from the use of "He" referring to Nebuchadnezzar in verses 7-11. Starting with verse 12, Ezekiel abruptly switches to using the word "They", indicating that the prophecy has moved on from the specific nation of Babylon to finish up telling about the rest of the "many nations". –  David Stratton Sep 24 '11 at 14:30
    
Curious George - you beat me to that. –  David Stratton Sep 24 '11 at 14:30
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1 Answer 1

Several are listed at this site: http://100prophecies.org/

The site does include several prophecies that are supported primarily by the Biblical record, but several include events that meet the criteria you asked for.

Excerpts:

Jesus prophesied that the Temple would be destroyed Bible prophecy: Matthew 24:1-2 Prophecy written: During the first century Prophecy fulfilled: 70 AD

In Matthew 24:1-2, Jesus prophesied that the Temple of Jerusalem would be destroyed and that its destruction would be so complete that not one stone would be left standing on top of another. His prophecy was fulfilled about 40 years later when the Romans destroyed Jerusalem and tore down the Temple. The destruction was so complete that even the foundations of the Temple were dug up, according to Josephus, an historian who wrote about the destruction


Jesus prophesied that the Jews would be exiled Bible prophecy: Luke 21:24 Prophecy written: During the first century Prophecy fulfilled: 70 AD

In Luke 21:24, Jesus said that Jerusalem would be trampled upon by foreigners and that the people of Israel would be forced into exile.

About 40 years after Jesus delivered that prophecy, it began to find fulfillment. The Romans destroyed Jerusalem in the year 70, and again in the year 135.

During the first destruction, Josephus, an historian who lived during the first century, claimed that 1.1 million Jews died and that hundreds of thousands were forced out of the country and into exile and slavery.

During the second destruction, Cassius Dio, an historian who lived during the second century, claimed that 580,000 Jews were killed, and that 50 fortified towns and 985 villages were destroyed.

The exiled Jews were taken to countries throughout the Roman Empire and eventually scattered and re-scattered throughout the world.


Daniel foretold the destruction of Jerusalem and the Temple Bible prophecy: Daniel 9:24-26 Prophecy written: About 530 BC Prophecy fulfilled: 70 AD

During the time of Daniel, who lived about 2600 years ago, the Babylonians invaded Judah (the southern part of the land of Israel) and took many Jews, including Daniel, as captives to Babylon.

The Babylonians also destroyed the city of Jerusalem and the Temple, in 586 B.C.

In Daniel 9:24-26, Daniel delivers a prophecy that Jerusalem and the Temple would be destroyed, again. Within these verses, Daniel provides a chronology by which certain events would occur. First, the Jews would return from captivity and rebuild Jerusalem and the Temple. Afterwards, an "anointed one," or Messiah, would appear, but he would be rejected. Then, Jerusalem and the Temple would be destroyed, again.

These events later played out during the century in which Jesus had announced that he was the Messiah.


Edom would be toppled and humbled Bible prophecy: Jeremiah 49:16 Prophecy written: Sometime between 626-586 BC Prophecy fulfilled: About 100 BC

In Jeremiah 49:16, the prophet said that Edom, a long-time enemy of Israel, would be destroyed. Edom's capital city, Petra, was carved out of a mountain side and had great natural defenses. Nonetheless, it was destroyed and the kingdom of Edom no longer exists. Today, Petra is part of Jordan. The city was conquered by the Romans in the year 106 AD but flourished again shortly after that. A rival city, Palmyra, eventually took most of the trade away from Petra and Petra began to decline. Petra gradually fell into ruin.

There's also this site: http://www.reasons.org/fulfilled-prophecy-evidence-reliability-bible

Which lists some more, such as...

The prophet Isaiah foretold that a conqueror named Cyrus would destroy seemingly impregnable Babylon and subdue Egypt along with most of the rest of the known world. This same man, said Isaiah, would decide to let the Jewish exiles in his territory go free without any payment of ransom (Isaiah 44:28; 45:1; and 45:13). Isaiah made this prophecy 150 years before Cyrus was born, 180 years before Cyrus performed any of these feats (and he did, eventually, perform them all), and 80 years before the Jews were taken into exile.


The exact location and construction sequence of Jerusalem's nine suburbs was predicted by Jeremiah about 2600 years ago. He referred to the time of this building project as "the last days," that is, the time period of Israel's second rebirth as a nation in the land of Palestine (Jeremiah 31:38-40). This rebirth became history in 1948, and the construction of the nine suburbs has gone forward precisely in the locations and in the sequence predicted.

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