Take the 2-minute tour ×
Christianity Stack Exchange is a question and answer site for committed Christians, experts in Christianity and those interested in learning more. It's 100% free, no registration required.

So Paul (previously Saul) became a believer and an effective advocate for Christ, but only after he had imprisoned several believers.

Acts 8:3 ESV But Saul was ravaging the church, and entering house after house, he dragged off men and women and committed them to prison.

Is it revealed in scripture anywhere that he went back and got those people out of prison? I would assume he did--I'm just curious if it's stated anywhere or implied or if there's a tradition about it.

share|improve this question
3  
I would assume he did not, since after he joined the group he was persecuting before, how would he any longer have authority with the persecutors to say "hey, let those guys go"? –  david brainerd Jul 11 at 15:39
    
@davidbrainerd That's a good point and a bummer thing to think about. –  LCIII Jul 11 at 15:41
    
Without Saul/Paul to bear witness against them (and take part in the punishment), his prisoners would have been released. –  gideon marx Jul 12 at 9:36
2  
@LCIII My speculative guess is that the matter was out of his hands after his committing them to prison/handing them over to the authorities with jurisdiction. cf. Judas –  FMS Jul 12 at 22:02

2 Answers 2

No where in the NT does it suggest that Saul/Paul was able to undo his wrong in persecuting the Christians after his conversion. He himself became the object of persecution himself so he would have had no power with the Jewish authorities and it was they that eventually organised his arrest. The persecutors are never concerned about Justice and can justify the most terrible wrong in their religious zeal - just think about the miscarriages of justice around Jesus's trial.

share|improve this answer

No. There is nowhere that suggests that Paul released the Chrisitians he imprisoned.

And we can't even assume that those he imprisoned were still under his control after he "committed them to prison." (Though if he could free them, it's reasonable to assume he would have.)

Paul's repentance (or what we know of it) was his ministry.

Then Ananias answered, Lord, I have heard by many of this man, how much evil he hath done to thy saints at Jerusalem...

But the Lord said unto him, Go thy way: for he is a chosen vessel unto me, to bear my name before the Gentiles, and kings, and the children of Israel...

And Ananias went his way, and entered into the house; and putting his hands on him...

And straightway he preached Christ in the synagogues, that he is the Son of God.

But all that heard him were amazed, and said; Is not this he that destroyed them which called on this name in Jerusalem, and came hither for that intent, that he might bring them bound unto the chief priests?

But Saul increased the more in strength, and confounded the Jews which dwelt at Damascus, proving that this is very Christ.

Acts 9:13-22

share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.