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Ezekiel 28 and Isaiah 14 both describe Satan's rebellion and being "cast out" of heaven.

This question here on this site has plenty of references about the actual "events":

When did Satan get cast out of heaven? Or is that yet to come?

And this site discusses Satan's fall as well: How did Lucifer fall and become Satan?

However, what I was curious about was whether there was any belief or discussion in Christianity about how God "felt" about Satan's rebellion? Seeing as how the Bible describes Lucifer as the "Morning Star" and head of the angels, was God grieved that his #1 angel rebelled?

I'm asking from a Protestant faith standpoint, but would be curious if Orthodox or Catholic faiths present a viewpoint on this issue as well.

While I can find specific scriptures such as Gen 6:6 and Eph 4:30 that discuss how God can be "grieved", I couldn't find specific scriptures that showed God's specific emotions regarding Satan's fall.

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Lucifer (Cherub) and Satan (Seraph) are different entities However, that doesn't really change your question much. Link1 Link2 –  The Freemason Apr 14 at 14:43
    
Your citing of Gen 6:6 and Eph 4:30 is good. That's probably as far as we can go in answering your question, however. I want to say God was indeed grieved at "losing" His chief angel. God had "invested" a great deal in Lucifer. Lucifer was beautiful to behold, and he perhaps had a special place, or ranking, in the third heaven. Perhaps he was an angel of angels, a leader of other angels in the worship and service of God. To say God had no feelings whatsoever when He found sin in Lucifer and was forced to eject him from the third heaven, seems wrong. What those feelings were, however . . .. Don –  rhetorician Apr 14 at 16:01
    
@rhetorician: Why don't you make that an answer, then, rather than a comment? –  Flimzy Apr 14 at 17:57
    
@Flimzy: Yeah, I guess I could do that. Thanks for the vote of confidence. Don –  rhetorician Apr 14 at 18:40

3 Answers 3

up vote 4 down vote accepted

Your citing of Genesis 6:6 and Ephesians 4:30 is good. That's probably as far as we can go in answering your question, however.

I want to say God was indeed grieved by the sin of His chief angel, Lucifer. God had invested a great deal in Lucifer. Lucifer was beautiful to behold, and he perhaps had a special place, or ranking, in the third heaven. Perhaps he was an angel of angels, a leader of other angels in the worship and service of God. To say God had no feelings whatsoever when He found sin in Lucifer and was forced to eject him from the third heaven, seems wrong. As to what those feelings were, however, I think the Scripture is largely silent.

In re-reading the book of Job recently, I noticed something interesting, and I'll pass it along to you. We read in 1:6 and 2:1,

"Now there was a day when the sons of God came to present themselves before the LORD, and Satan also came among them."

"Again there was a day when the sons of God came to present themselves before the LORD, and Satan also came among them to present himself before the LORD."

The thought came to me: Hmm, the sons of God presented themselves before the LORD. I wonder if this event is repeated on a regular basis throughout history.

I suggest--I repeat, suggest--that this formal reporting, as it were, may in fact be a regular occurrence in God's universe, at least in the spiritual realm.

My thinking on this is as follows: 1) God alone is Sovereign, and He is sovereign over everything and everybody in all creation; 2) He holds things together (all things cohere through Him and the word of His power); and 3) no one can escape accountability to Him.

"And there is no creature hidden from His sight, but all things are open and laid bare to the eyes of Him with whom we have to do" (Hebrews 4:13 NAS).

If these things are so, then perhaps God has a "standing appointment" with the sons of God (i.e., the fallen angels) to "keep tabs on them," so to speak. Being omniscient, He knows what they've been doing, of course, but the verses in Job simplify things for the benefit of us readers. Since His fallen angels are not omniscient (nor are they omnipotent or omnipresent), they need to be reminded frequently of what they may and may not do.

In particular, I think God, in His watchful care over His children, allows the infernal hosts of wickedness to "sift us as wheat" from time to time, as He did with Job and Peter, for example.

  • Job: "Then the LORD said to Satan, 'Behold, all that he has is in your power; only do not put forth your hand on him.' So Satan departed from the presence of the LORD" (1:12).

  • Job: "So the LORD said to Satan, 'Behold, he is in your power, only spare his life'" (2:6).

  • Peter: "'And the Lord said, 'Simon, Simon, behold, Satan hath desired to have you, that he may sift you as wheat: But I have prayed for thee, that thy faith fail not: and when thou art converted, strengthen thy brethren" (Luke 22:31-32).

God, however, puts limits on what they (and the devil) can do, as He did with Job, when He told Satan he was not allowed to take Job's life (2:6). God also knows if and when we will repent, if in our being "sifted" we fail the test, as with Peter:

"'But I have prayed for you, that your faith may not fail; and you, when once you have turned again, strengthen your brothers'" (ibid.).

In conclusion, obviously God and Satan are on speaking terms, and Satan is on a short leash, as it were. Satan, however, knows that his time is short. His authority and activity as the "prince of the power of the air" are finite and will end one day when he is cast into hell, which was designed by God for the devil and his angels. Sad to say, many others will likewise be cast into hell one day, and I'm sure this, too, grieves God.

Consequently, God is patient and forbearing with us. Moreover,

"The Lord is not slack concerning his promise, as some men count slackness; but is longsuffering to us-ward, not willing that any should perish , but that all should come to repentance" (2 Peter 3:9 KJV).

I believe Satan can never, will never, repent. Human beings, however, God encourages to repent, and they are free to do so until the day they die. Once they die, however, repentance is not possible.

". . . as it is appointed unto men once to die, but after this the judgment: So Christ was once offered to bear the sins of many; and unto them that look for him shall he appear the second time without sin unto salvation" (Hebrews 9:27-28 KJV, my emphasis).

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Surely God was grieved, since we know that:1st John 4:8 says "He that loveth not knoweth not God; for God is love". –  Bye Apr 14 at 19:48
    
@Bye: Good point! Don –  rhetorician Apr 14 at 20:25
    
Thank you for the answer. I believe you are right after looking around some more that this is just something that isn't pinpointed and would end up being speculation based on other scriptures. Thank you! –  TheCleaner Apr 16 at 12:53
    
@TheCleaner: You're welcome, I'm sure. I've edited my answer by adding an additional thought about the sifting process. Blessings on you! Don –  rhetorician Apr 16 at 13:57

I believe Revelation 12;3,4,12 discribes Satan's fall to earth.

  1. And there appeared another wonder in heaven; and behold a great red dragon, having seven heads and ten horns, and seven crowns upon his heads. 4 And his tail drew the third part of the stars of heaven , and did cast them to the earth: And the dragon stood before the woman which was ready to be delivered, for to devour her child as soon as it was born. 12 Therefore rejoice ye heavens, and ye that dwell in them. Woe to the inhabiters of earth and of the sea! for the devil has come down unto you, having great wrath, because he knoweth that he hath but a short time.

Aparently, Satan's fall coincided with the end of creation, because he deceived earth's first inhabitants.

Matthew 10;29,30,31

29 Are not two sparrows sold for a farthing? and one of them shall not fall on the ground without your Father. 30 But the very hairs of your head are all numbered. 31 Fear ye not therefore, ye are of more value than many sparrows.

Psalms 8;5 For thou hast made him a little lower than the angels, and hast crowned him with glory and honour.

2Peter 3;9 The Lord is not slack concerning his promise, as some men count slackness; but is longsuffering to us-ward, not willing that any should perish, but that all should come to repentance.

I believe God cares for all his creatures, from the greatest to the least.

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  1. Emotion is the product of desire vs result.
  2. Emotions like happiness come from encountering results that are desirable.
  3. Emotions like anger and sadness come from encountering results that are undesirable.
  4. Attributing emotions like sadness to God is simply to say that there is an in-congruency between what God desires and a result. (God desires men to choose goodness, but they choose wickedness).
  5. The advantage of ascribing emotion rather than just saying, "God found it undesirable", is that emotions better indicate personal involvement/investment. (Consider the following sentences: Todd ate the carrot but found the taste undesirable. OR When it came time to eat the carrot after any hours of gardening, Todd was grieved by the taste).

6.Since God does not delight in evil, but rejoices in the truth, and that God is involved/invested in all of creation, it would be fair to say that God is grieved or angered by all agents of wickedness.

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