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Many traditional Hebrew personal names contain a reference to God in their meaning. For example the name יְהוֹשֻֽׁעַ׃ Joshua means 'Yahwah is salvation'.

But what about Yahwah itself [יְהוָ֨ה] ? Is the tetragrammaton wholly and directly used in any name of a person in the OT?

The only place I know is at Jeremiah 23:6. "In His days Judah will be saved, And Israel will dwell securely; And this is His name by which He will be called, 'The LORD [יְהוָ֨ה] our righteousness.'"

Follow-up questions: is Jeremiah referring to a the name of a person? And is this a reference to the Messiah?

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2 Answers 2

When the monks translated the King James version, They considered the name of God(yehôvâh) to be so Holy that they would not translate יהוה to the word yehôvâh, instead they inserted LORD in it's place. They used all capitol letters as a form of honoring the Deity.

Later translations which bore heavily on the King James translation also used that capitalized word in place of Jehovah, YHWH, God, Elohim, YAHWEH as we find in some translations.

Here are some examples:

(ASV) And Jehovah God formed man of the dust of the ground, and breathed into his nostrils the breath of life; and man became a living soul.

(Darby) And Jehovah Elohim formed Man, dust of the ground, and breathed into his nostrils the breath of life; and Man became a living soul.

(ESV) then the LORD God formed the man of dust from the ground and breathed into his nostrils the breath of life, and the man became a living creature.

(HRB) And YAHWEH Elohim formed the man from the dust of the ground, and blew into his nostrils the breath of life; and the man became a living soul.

(ISV) So the LORD God formed the man from the dust of the ground, breathed life into his lungs, and the man became a living being.

(KJV-BRG) And the LORD God formed man of the dust of the ground, and breathed into his nostrils the breath of life; and man became a living soul.

(LITV) And Jehovah God formed the man out of dust from the ground, and blew into his nostrils the breath of life; and man became a living soul.

(MKJV) And Jehovah God formed man of the dust of the ground, and breathed into his nostrils the breath of life; and man became a living soul.

Other translations as you can see used other terms.

The word LORD then is a substitute word, which wen used in the King James version was not a connotation associated with the Supreme being, as it is now.

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When the monks translated the KJV? What is that about? –  H3br3wHamm3r81 Mar 3 at 19:25
    
Here is an article about the history of the letter J. en.wikipedia.org/wiki/J –  Only he is good. Mar 3 at 22:58
    
@H3br3wHamm3r81 Check out these websites: escapeallthesethings.com/yahweh.htm and bible-researcher.com/kjvhist.html –  Bye Mar 5 at 0:36
    
I think the question is asking whether the tetragrammaton is contained within the names of any other people in the Bible rather than one of the shorter versions like Ya/Ja etc. So this answer, while very informative, isn't really answering the question. –  curiousdannii Mar 10 at 0:34

God's name is holy, I know of no other usage as Yeoua "Yih - oo - ah" (יהוה). He does prefer that we call to him for saving so he has named some Yeoush "Yih - oo - sh" (יהושע) or otherwise rendered Yeshou "Yih - Sh - oo" (ישוע) [I think, still researching this pronunciation] it could possibly be rendered Yishou "Yish - oo" (ישוע). In all cases however, history proves the the final Ayin (ע) is silent.

Later translated into Greek as Yeshoush "Yih - Sh - oo -Sh" [again pretty sure], The sound (Y) Being the Greek (I) changed the spelling to Ieshoush. The Greek letters had no sound for (sh) the closest sound was the sigma (s) which changed the spelling to Iesous.

Later when translated into English the Greek (I) became the English (J) changing the spelling to Jesous. The sound for (OU) became simplified to (U). Leaving us with our English version Jesus.

The name as a call For Him To Save Us is used in many forms (ref: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Jesus_%28name%29)

In Christianity, we believe that the Father sent his son so that we may be saved by calling on the saving grace of the Father through the "Son's Name".

"And whatever you ask in My name, that I will do, that the Father may be glorified in the Son." (John 14:13 NKJV)

"Father, glorify Your name.” Then a voice came from heaven, saying, “I have both glorified it and will glorify it again." (John 12:28 NKJV)

"Nor is there salvation in any other, for there is no other name under heaven given among men by which we must be saved." (Acts 4:12 NKJV)

"I have come in My Father’s name, and you do not receive Me; if another comes in his own name, him you will receive." (John 5:43 NKJV)

Is Jeremiah referring to a the name of a person? Yes it is the name of God.

"But I will gather ..." (Jeremiah 23:3 NKJV)

And is this a reference to the Messiah? The Messiah has always been God. The son came with words from the Father.

I have many things to say and to judge concerning you, but He who sent Me is true; and I speak to the world those things which I heard from Him. (John 8:26 NKJV)

Behold . the days . come . says . Yeoua . And I establish . unto David . the branch . righteous . and shall reign . as king . and prosper . and shall execute . judgment . and justice . in the land. (Jeremiah 23:5 Word by Word)

Translated easily as:

"Behold the days come says Yeoua, and I establish unto David the righteous branch and I shall reign as King, prosper, and shall execute judgment and justice in the land. (Jeremiah 23:5 De-Analogized)

Therefore since the truth can come upon you at any moment, keep watch, lest you be found with pride, and cast to the fires of anger and depression that separates loved ones. Yet the humble will stand in their faith, and those that deny will be cast to anger and depression.

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Thank you for your answer. May I ask: you say, 'the Messiah has always been God.' I understand how this position is supported by NT scripture. But I do not see much support in the OT, with the exception of Isaiah 9:6. Is anyone aware of OT scripture that supports the idea that the Messiah will also be God? I am struggling with this question myself and would appreciate any advice/help. –  Poppy Mar 3 at 23:32
    
[Deuteronomy 18:18 | John 1] [Daniel 9:24-27 | The Messiah will be put to death] [Zechariah 13:7 | Notice the man is connected as the Shepard] [Genesis 49:24 | During Jacobs Blessing, he validates the Shepards Position] [Psalms 100:3, Ezekiel 34:31, Psalms 23:2-3, Isaiah 40:11, Psalms 23:1, Genesis 48:15] [Isaiah 53, Jeremiah 23:5 | A Tender Plant, The Righteous Branch] [Psalm 22 | Is very similar in nature to the explained death scene of Jesus] and [Zechariah 12:10]. Know that the Word is God, if his word is in us, then we are a temple. For the Father used the word to make all things. –  Only he is good. Mar 4 at 13:08

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