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The bible many times specifically tell us to stone people...

Yet, I have yet to meet someone that defends that practice.

I've heard many times that this is because the OT is not valid anymore because Jesus have fulfilled it, the problem with that argument, is that then you can argue that several OT-only sins are not sin anymore.

I saw many atheists winning arguments calling us hypocrites for not following several parts of Leviticus (that for example says male homosexuals should get stone), and when I ask about it, people tell me that those are not valid anymore because of the new covenant, but for example bestiality (sex with animals) are only forbidden there... Thus if it is not valid, we cannot say to anyone that having sex with animals is a sin.

EDIT: Question not duplicate, because I am asking specifically about stoning, not the whole law in 'general', also the answer for that question is unclear on this case anyway, they decide what they must keep, but don't decide what punishments they must keep, for example "adultery" has stoning as punishment, the answer of the other question says that laws on sexual issues are kept, thus stoning would still be valid.

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marked as duplicate by Narnian, wax eagle Jan 20 at 15:50

This question has been asked before and already has an answer. If those answers do not fully address your question, please ask a new question.

    
Related: Why did Jesus not stone the adulteress?. I'm not happy with the answer there and also disappointed with the closed reason as duplicate. –  Mawia Jan 20 at 13:51
    
This question comes up quite often in many different forms. The Mosaic Covenant was with a certain people (the Jews) for a certain period of time (~2500 BC - 33 AD). We don't stone people because 1) we aren't Jewish, and 2) we are under a new covenant, spoken of in Ezekiel and instituted at the Last Supper, and 3) we are not a government. –  Narnian Jan 20 at 14:13
    
@Mawia consider commenting on the answer you have an issue with, I'm sure the author would be willing to respond to constructive criticism. –  wax eagle Jan 20 at 15:51
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This question is not a duplicate. One can follow the laws of Moses without stoning anybody as all of Judaism does. In fact nobody knows when last there was a stoning under Jewish law. Stoning is a completely seperate issue and it is very important for Christians to understand the reasoning. –  gideon marx Jan 20 at 16:26
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This isn't a duplicate, or at least, the answers to the cited question do not answer this question. One could argue that, as Christians are told to submit to civil authorities, that we should not be dragging people out and stoning them for violations of OT law when the civil authorities have other procedures. But that's a side issue. Suppose that's Christians elected a majority to Congress. Should those legislators pass a law requiring stoning of adulterers? Why or why not? Of course we're seeking a Biblical answer here and not "no because the Old Testament laws are stupid and out of date". –  Jay Jan 22 at 5:53
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Both the Gospels and the Epistles repeatedly establish the New Covenant as a non-legalistic relationship with God --a new relationship not founded in following specific rules.

However, as Paul says, not everything that is allowed is beneficial. As a Christian, you need to be guided by your relationship with Christ and by a spirit of discernment to understand what is and is not beneficial to your mission of being an instrument of God's love in the world. Unfortunately sometimes Christians do disagree strongly with each other on moral issues --that's just a fact of life.

In specific regards to stoning, we have additional guidance in the form of two mentions of the practice in the New Testament. Once, when Jesus is invited to join in the stoning, and is instead merciful, and the other time, when Stephen becomes the first Christian martyr though being stoned to death by friends of Saul/Paul. Both of these passages guide us towards rejecting stoning and the judgment that it represents. (Some Christians, including myself, view it as guiding us away from capital punishment in general, but this is controversial).

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