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There is a passage in the Bible talks about an eunuch traveling on the road and reading from Isaiah. The Phillip saw him, talked to him, and baptized him. Which passage is it? Is that passage enough to prove that repentance, faith, and therefore salvation is not necessarily followed by an emotional experience, but it is as decision to follow Christ? Especially if one has grown up in the church and taught to obey the 10 commandments anyway? Also, do we have an account of Timothy's (or someone else who grew up in the church) salvation? Thanks.

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Philip and the Ethiopian: Acts 8:26-40. –  Andrew Leach Sep 20 '13 at 20:31
    
As for your first question (about an emotional experience accompanying conversion), how do you know the Ethiopian treasurer was NOT emotional after Philip led him to the Lord? In general, however, the Bible does not guarantee that each one of us upon conversion will have an "emotional experience." The same goes for being miraculously delivered from drug addiction, sexual sins, cursing, prejudice, bigotry, violence, chronic anger, and perhaps a score of other besetting sins. Sometimes God does deliver us instantly (praise Him!), but other times, not. God converts originals, not duplicates! –  rhetorician Sep 20 '13 at 20:43
    
@rhetorician well just the way the story is narrated it makes me think that the eunuch was just listening carefully, then Phillip asked him, he said yes, and he was saved. And about the emotional experience, what do you think about some preachers today who say you have to feel sorrow for your sin, otherwise it is not true repentance? Is it possible to come to true repentance and not really feel sorrow? –  Ovi Sep 20 '13 at 20:55
    
@rhetorician and of course I know I could be completely wrong on what actually took place with the eunuch –  Ovi Sep 20 '13 at 21:02
    
@Ovi: The preachers you refer to may--I say MAY--have a point. I, however, prefer to say that repentance involves, in part, saying "I'm sorry" to God and MEANING it. Do you necessarily need to feel sorry? Frankly, I don't know. The apostle Paul talks about "the sorrow that is according to the will of God produces a repentance without regret, leading to salvation, but the sorrow of the world produces death" (2 Corinthians 7:10). What does this verse say to you personally? –  rhetorician Sep 21 '13 at 0:55

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Actually, notice that after being baptised, the eunuch went on his way rejoicing, which is an expression of joy, which some would call an emotional experience. Whether or not it is, it flies in the face of the suggestion that obedience to God and joy are unconnected. There are many scriptures which underline the link between joy and righteouness. Here are 2:

You have loved righteousness and hated lawlessness; Therefore God, Your God, has anointed You With the oil of gladness more than Your companions.”
(Hebrews 1.9)

If you keep My commandments, you will abide in My love, just as I have kept My Father’s commandments and abide in His love. “These things I have spoken to you, that My joy may remain in you, and that your joy may be full.
(John 15,10+11)

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This is good, but I think I should've mentioned that I was focusing more on an experience of sorrow rather than joy. –  Ovi Sep 23 '13 at 14:08
    
Thanks. Praise the Lord. Being saved certainly wouldn't cause sorrow. In Psalm 51 David refers to the joy of God's salvation: 'Restore to me the joy of Your salvation, And uphold me by Your generous Spirit.' (Psalm 51.12). –  George Tomlinson Sep 23 '13 at 14:51
    
Yes faith causes joy, but I was wondering about some of the preachers today who say that unless you feel sorrow for your sins you have not really repented. For example, this video: youtube.com/watch?v=FfJTPkrQdZE talks about that. John MacArthur has a sermon which is basically the same thing, and Paul Washer also says that if you really reached true repentance you should feel sorrow and some people even weep for their sins. Then comes the joy of salvation when you trust in Jesus. –  Ovi Sep 23 '13 at 16:39
    
continued: Do you think that is accurate in regards to the experience of the eunuch and other parts of the Bible? –  Ovi Sep 23 '13 at 16:39
    
Sin certainly causes sorrow. God himself was so upset by people's continual sin that He flooded the earth and destroyed most of mankind. I'm sure most people have cried many times in their lives, and this is because of sin. Without sin, there will be no more crying for those who make it to heaven: 'And God will wipe away every tear from their eyes; there shall be no more death, nor sorrow, nor crying. There shall be no more pain, for the former things have passed away.”' (Rev 21.4). In this world though, we will have to cry because of the trouble that people' sins cause us and them. –  George Tomlinson Sep 24 '13 at 5:27

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