Take the 2-minute tour ×
Christianity Stack Exchange is a question and answer site for committed Christians, experts in Christianity and those interested in learning more. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I am hearing with increasing frequency that Islam is not a religion. Here's one citation, from the upcoming "Value Voters Summit"

“Why would Satan use Islam? Same reason. It’s not a religion. It’s a movement to dominate the world under the guise of religion."

How have missionaries to Islamic countries (or other prominent evangelists) described or worded the "incorrectness" of Islam? What criteria have been used, if this phrase has roots in church history, between a non-salvific religion, and "not a religion?"

share|improve this question

closed as too broad by Affable Geek, warren, Flimzy, David Stratton, DJClayworth Sep 2 '13 at 2:58

There are either too many possible answers, or good answers would be too long for this format. Please add details to narrow the answer set or to isolate an issue that can be answered in a few paragraphs.If this question can be reworded to fit the rules in the help center, please edit the question.

    
James 1:27 -- "Pure religion and undefiled before God and the Father is this, To visit the fatherless and widows in their affliction, and to keep himself unspotted from the world." From the biblical perspective, only Christianity is the one true religion; there is no other way to be undefiled by the world but by the life-changing power of God and the blood of Jesus. The missionaries are simply stating a fact in that brochure. The Bible is the criteria used! –  Steve Aug 29 '13 at 13:45
    
You are conflating those with a political motivation (e.g. the Values Voters) with missionaries who have a religious motivation. Political people are going to say its political, Religious people are going to say its religious. That's just what people do. –  Affable Geek Aug 29 '13 at 16:30
    
The question title is a list question and/or "too broad." The body seems to be asking if Islam is a religion or a political movement, which is unrelated to the title. –  Flimzy Aug 29 '13 at 18:09
    
Frankly I'm sure there are some Christian missionaries or evangelists who have used every term under the sun to describe Islam, from positive to offensive. –  DJClayworth Sep 2 '13 at 2:59

1 Answer 1

From what I know from speaking with those who have been missionaries in Islamic countries and from reading books written by such people, it seems that the strategy is not to demonstrate that Islam is incorrect, but to simply present Jesus (the prophet Isa) to people. Jesus is acknowledged as a prophet by Islam.

The Koran on Jesus

The Koran talks about Jesus and says quite a few good things about him. I actually met a man who was formerly a Muslim from a very Islamic country who discovered for himself from the Koran that Moses received the Law, Mohammed received the Koran, but Jesus received the Spirit. He reasoned that what Jesus received was greater than the Law or the Koran, and so he went in search of Jesus. So, pointing Muslims to the verses in the Koran about Jesus is one strategy that is used.

The Koran on the Word of God

Another tactic is to read the verses in the Koran that teach how God's word cannot be changed and its commands to read the Scriptures given beforehand. Many Muslims are taught that the Bible is corrupted, but the Koran contradicts this by saying that God's word cannot be altered. This often leads Muslims to start reading the Bible.

Dreams

Finally, it seems that quite a few Muslims have had dreams where Jesus appears to them. So common is this that some missionaries have simply started to ask Muslims that they meet if they have ever had a dream about Jesus.

Conclusion

So, again, the strategy with followers of Islam is pretty much the same with anyone else. Jesus is presented as the eternal Son of God, crucified, and risen from the dead. The point is not to criticize other teachings, but to exalt the Lord Jesus Christ.

share|improve this answer

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.