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That is what sometime I hear some preacher mentioning.

Heaven is a place where there is no suffering but all happiness and that is what we are aiming for, by trying to live a good life on earth. Jesus came to this world to save sinners. He suffered for our sins and was crucified to save all those who believe in Him. He was raised from the death so that we all can have an everlasting life in heaven with Him.

It is sometime preached that for all the sins that are being committed by us and for all the sins that are being committed in this world, Jesus continues to suffer. Is Jesus still suffering for sins that are being committed everyday in this world? I find it a bit difficult to believe this because Jesus after His glorification, His suffering came to an end and there is no need for Him to again suffer and die for us again. Is it not that God has to be happy in heaven and not grieve for His creation because heaven is a place where there is no pain and hurt but only happiness?

Is this teaching correct or is it that we are being just reminded to live a good life by recalling that, because of our sins, Jesus has already suffered and died a miserable death not commensurate with His stature as God?

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2 Answers 2

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No Jesus suffered once in the flesh then he said it is finished.

Joh 19:30 When Jesus therefore had received the vinegar, he said, It is finished: and he bowed his head, and gave up the ghost.

Notice the once:

1Pe 3:17 For it is better, if the will of God be so, that ye suffer for well doing, than for evil doing.

1Pe 3:18 For Christ also hath once suffered for sins, the just for the unjust, that he might bring us to God, being put to death in the flesh, but quickened by the Spirit:

Notice this once as well:

Heb 9:28 So Christ was once offered to bear the sins of many; and unto them that look for him shall he appear the second time without sin unto salvation.

And finally this once:

Heb 10:10 By the which will we are sanctified through the offering of the body of Jesus Christ once for all.

Also notice the tense here is past:

1Pe 4:1 Forasmuch then as Christ hath suffered for us in the flesh, arm yourselves likewise with the same mind: for he that hath suffered in the flesh hath ceased from sin;

1Pe 4:2 That he no longer should live the rest of his time in the flesh to the lusts of men, but to the will of God.

However there does remain suffering left to be done for the work of Christ just not by Christ Himself and not as a sin offering for the World. As we correctly suffer for Christ persecution, affliction and resisting temptation we fill up what remains of the afflictions of Christ.

Col 1:24 Who now rejoice in my sufferings for you, and fill up that which is behind of the afflictions of Christ in my flesh for his body's sake, which is the church:

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Excellent answer. Nice work. The two quotes from Hebrews were perfect. –  Jas 3.1 Mar 30 '13 at 19:59

Christ's passion was outside of time, His suffering transcended our world. He suffers for our sins until the end of our world. This has been attested to by many of the Church's mystics, who saw Christ suffering for the conversion of sinners; He asked for their participation. When we take up our crosses, we unite our suffering to the suffering of Christ.

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