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According to the Watchtower publication Insight,

This Word, or Lo′gos, was God’s only direct creation, the only-begotten son of God, and evidently the close associate of God to whom God was speaking when he said: “Let us make man in our image, according to our likeness.” (Ge 1:26) Hence John continued, saying: “This one was in the beginning with God. All things came into existence through him, and apart from him not even one thing came into existence.”—Joh 1:2, 3.

Source: http://wol.jw.org/en/wol/d/r1/lp-e/1200004625

The publication states that the λόγος was God's only direct creation, the only-begotten son of God." Furthermore, it also identifies the λόγος as Jesus Christ.

This Word, or Lo′gos, was God’s only direct creation, the only-begotten son of God, and evidently the close associate of God to whom God was speaking when he said: “Let us make man in our image, according to our likeness.” (Ge 1:26) Hence John continued, saying: “This one was in the beginning with God. All things came into existence through him, and apart from him not even one thing came into existence.”—Joh 1:2, 3.

Source: http://wol.jw.org/en/wol/d/r1/lp-e/1200004625

The claim is that God's λόγος, the Word of God (ὁ λόγος τοῦ θεοῦ), is a creation (and thus, a creature). If God's λόγος was created, then it did not exist before it was created. The corollary is that God at one point lacked λόγος, or was ἄλογος. The Greek word ἄλογος means "without reason, logic; irrational; illogical."

Source: http://www.blueletterbible.org/lang/lexicon/lexicon.cfm?strongs=G249; http://www.perseus.tufts.edu/hopper/morph?l=a%29%2Flogos&la=greek#lexicon

The Greek letter α (alpha) prefixed to a word signifies absence, opposition, or negation.

Source: http://www.blueletterbible.org/lang/lexicon/Lexicon.cfm?Strongs=G1&t=KJV

For example, the Greek word νόμος (nomos) means "Law." When prefixed with the Greek letter α, it means "without law; lawless."

Source: http://www.blueletterbible.org/lang/lexicon/Lexicon.cfm?strongs=G459

While the Greek word λόγος is most often translated simply as "word," it also possesses the meaning of "reason" and "logic."

Source: http://www.blueletterbible.org/lang/lexicon/Lexicon.cfm?strongs=G3056

Something which possesses reason, or the ability to reason, is said to be "rational."

Source: http://dictionary.reference.com/browse/rational?s=t

Something that lacks reason is said to be "irrational."

Source: http://dictionary.reference.com/browse/irrational?s=t

The consequence of the argument that God created the λόγος was that God was at one point ἄλογος, or without reason, illogical, or irrational.

How do Arians and/or Jehovah's Witnesses respond when it is said that their God was without reason, irrational, and illogical?

What does this say about God's supposed immutability?

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Do few Jehova's Witnesses visit this site? –  H3br3wHamm3r81 Dec 6 '12 at 17:38
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Perhaps. But I think it more likely that you've created an elaborate logical framework for something that is most likely self-evident to the JW's, and have couched your question in a way that is unlikely to be challenged, since it is clearly evident that you have the logical chops to pummel anyone who disagrees. Although no one has explicitly stated it yet, your question could be interpreted as an attempt to engage in debate over what is arguably a legalistic, literal interpretation of the theology. See also meta.islam.stackexchange.com/questions/275 –  Robert Harvey Dec 6 '12 at 22:04
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No, that's not Witness theology, but this is not an argument I've ever seen before, and I'm not aware of any office Witness response to it. Still, I'll do my best to refute this allegation. –  TRiG Dec 7 '12 at 21:29
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I think it's a bit far-fetched to claim that God without the Word was irrational, basing that premise entirely on the technicalities of Greek. It is a false logic. –  Andrew Leach Dec 8 '12 at 0:02
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"You say you have a dog?" "Yes, a real rogue." "And he has puppies?" "Yes, and they are very like himself." "And the dog is the father of them?" "Yes, I certainly saw him and the mother of the puppies come together." "And is he not yours?" "To be sure, he is." "Then he is a father, and he is yours, and accordingly he is your father, and the puppies are your brothers!" - Plato, Euthydemus 298e, illustrating the dangers of equivocation. The use of logos to refer to Christ does not imply that every other meaning of logos applies to him as well. –  James T Dec 8 '12 at 2:49
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1 Answer

If I'm understanding you correctly, this is your central claim:

If God's λόγος was created, then it did not exist before it was created. The corollary is that God at one point lacked λόγος, or was ἄλογος. The Greek word ἄλογος means "without reason, logic; irrational; illogical."

Yeah. No. It doesn't quite work like that.

God is God. Immutable. Unchangeable. The same yesterday, today, and tomorrow. Any wisdom he now has is wisdom he has always had.

The Λόγος is a separate being (better known to us as Jesus, but bearing many other names besides, including Michael). The word is not, in this context, describing a quality of God, or an aspect of his nature. It's a name. Of a person. No doubt it's a meaningful name, and the person so described is wise, but that does not mean that others lack wisdom, discernment, and rationality. Notably, God himself possesses all those qualities. And always has done.

How do Arians and/or Jehovah's Witnesses respond when it is said that their God was without reason, irrational, and illogical?

I dunno. I've never heard it said before. As far as I'm aware, this question is unique to you.

I must say that the concept of or an irrational God becoming rational would be a rather artistically pleasing element to a creation myth, but it does not form part of Witness theology.

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TRiG: "God is God. Immutable. Unchangeable. The same yesterday, today, and tomorrow." That's interesting. That's what Hebrews 13:8 says about Jesus Christ, i.e. "the same yesterday, today, and forever." How is that possible if Jesus is only a god (a creature)? –  H3br3wHamm3r81 Dec 7 '12 at 23:03
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