Take the 2-minute tour ×
Christianity Stack Exchange is a question and answer site for committed Christians, experts in Christianity and those interested in learning more. It's 100% free, no registration required.

In the first chapter of the Gospel of John, the following account of John the Baptist's introduction of Jesus is given:

29 The next day he saw Jesus coming toward him, and said, “Behold, the Lamb of God, who takes away the sin of the world! 30 This is he of whom I said, ‘After me comes a man who ranks before me, because he was before me.’ 31 I myself did not know him, but for this purpose I came baptizing with water, that he might be revealed to Israel.” 32 And John bore witness: “I saw the Spirit descend from heaven like a dove, and it remained on him. 33 I myself did not know him, but he who sent me to baptize with water said to me, ‘He on whom you see the Spirit descend and remain, this is he who baptizes with the Holy Spirit.’ 34 And I have seen and have borne witness that this is the Son of God.” John 1:29-34

John specifically states that the one who sent him to baptize with water was the one who informed him that he would be able to recognize the one for whom he himself was the predecessor. The indicator would be that John would see the Spirit come down and remain on him.

So, my question is, "Who was it that sent John to baptize with water and who told him how he would be able to recognize Jesus?" Is there anything in church tradition or elsewhere in the Bible that informs us who this was? An angel? God Himself? Another prophet?

share|improve this question

5 Answers 5

up vote 10 down vote accepted

When the angel came to Zechariah to announce the birth of John, he said that the child would be "filled with the Holy Spirit, even from his mother's womb. (Lk 1:15)" Also, Jesus said of John that "all the Prophets and the Law prophesied until John. (Mt 11:13)" It seems most reasonable to view him as a prophet like those of the OT, that he was commissioned and sent directly by God, and that he received inspiration and revelation directly from God.

share|improve this answer

Of course.

John 1:6 (KJV) There was a man sent from God, whose name was John.

ἐγένετο ἄνθρωπος ἀπεσταλμένος παρὰ θεοῦ ὄνομα αὐτῷ Ἰωάννης

God the Father sent John.

share|improve this answer
    
Fantastic. Thank you for this very clear and concise addition. –  Sticmann Nov 9 '12 at 22:26

I believe that Gabriel sent him. Holding to, that The Lord our God is one, there had to have been another "person" to have sent John, if God (Emmanuel) was amongst us at the time.

share|improve this answer
    
Welcome to C.SE. When you get the chance, please fund out how we are different than other sites. As it stands, this answer isn't very well supported. It would be helpful, for example, to say why you believe what you wrote, and more importantly, who else agrees with you. –  Affable Geek Aug 24 '13 at 3:34

There is a line of reasoning, which has inspired several religions over the centuries, that says: John was meant to have been the Messiah; but when he reached his “Garden of Gethsemane” moment, he turned aside, and God left “the bitter cup” instead pass to Jesus. Some of the Johnnites and early St John followers of the early Church were of that belief; the l

Of course, among others, some Gnostics, including the Mandeans, Johnnites, and so forth, consider that John was, in fact, a Messiah or The Messiah.

share|improve this answer
1  
Please mention the source of this rare information, which denomination, which tradition, which scholar etc. –  Mawia Aug 24 '13 at 19:22

Because the Word says "God sent him" (John 1:6) it must have been The Father by way of the Holy Spirit - God is One manifested in 3. At the time the Son was on earth, the Holy Spirit and The Father was still in heaven, until the baptism of Jesus when the Holy Spirit joined Him. Afterwards on the mount of transfiguration Jesus was seen together with Moses and Elijah and ANOTHER voice spoke - being the Father. Clear description of the Godhead three in one. Therefore it must be the Father who sent John.

share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.